All Exhibitions

Exhibitions listed in reverse chronological order by opening date.

Click here for a listing of exhibitions currently on view at the Museum.


2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

  • Detour: Architecture and Design along 18 National Tourist Routes in Norway (January 28, 2009–May 25, 2009)
  • Architecture of Authority: Photographs by Richard Ross (April 18, 2009–August 16, 2009)
  • Storefront Churches: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara (June 20, 2009–November 29, 2009)
  • Form and Movement: Photographs by Philip Trager (July 11, 2009–January 3, 2010)
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 7, 2009–April 23, 2010)
  • The Places We Live (September 18, 2009–November 15, 2009)
  • House of Cars: Innovation and the Parking Garage (October 17, 2009–July 11, 2010)

2008

  • Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future (May 3, 2008–August 24, 2008)
  • Investigating Where We Live (July 30, 2008–January 19, 2009)
  • The Art of Recycling: The Coolest Show in Town (August 25, 2008–September 2, 2008)
  • Life Without Leaves (September 17, 2008–November 2, 2008)
  • Green Community (October 23, 2008–November 29, 2009)
  • A Celebration of HRH The Prince of Wales’s Influence on the Built Environment (November 16, 2008–November 23, 2008)
  • Special Presentation: The World Trade Center Model (November 18, 2008–January 14, 2009)

2007

  • Reinventing the Globe: A Shakespearean Theater for the 21st Century (January 13, 2007– October 8, 2007)
  • David Macaulay: The Art of Drawing Architecture (June 23, 2007–May 4, 2008)
  • Lasting Foundations: The Art of Architecture in Africa (October 6, 2007–January 13, 2008)
  • Marcel Breuer: Design and Architecture (November 3, 2007–February 17, 2008)

2006

  • Julius Shulman: Modernity and the Metropolis (April 1, 2006–July 30, 2006)
  • Newer Orleans: A Shared Space (April 29, 2006–July 30, 2006)
  • The Green House: New Directions in Sustainable Architecture and Design (May 20, 2006–June 24, 2007)
  • Prairie Skyscraper: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Price Tower (June 17, 2006–September 17, 2006)
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 19, 2006–November 29, 2006)

2005

  • OPEN: New Designs for Public Space (January 5, 2005– May 15, 2005)
  • Tools of the Imagination (March 5, 2005–October 10, 2005)
  • Kids’ View of the City 2005: Eaton Elementary School Student Projects (June 7, 2005–July 31, 2005)
  • Jewish Washington: Scrapbook of an American Community (June 24, 2005–July 4, 2006)
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 13, 2005–February 19, 2006)
  • Civitas: Traditional Urbanism in Contemporary Practice (November 5, 2005–January 8, 2006)
  • A Building Tradition: The Work of the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts (November 5, 2005–January 8, 2006)
  • Cityscapes Revealed: Highlights from the Collection (December 3, 2005–January 7, 2013)

2004

  • Tools As Art: The Hechinger Collection–Instruments of Change (January 1, 2004–February 9, 2004)
  • DC Builds: The Anacostia Waterfront (January 17, 2004–June 6, 2004)
  • Symphony in Steel: Ironworkers and the Walt Disney Concert Hall (January 31, 2004–November 28, 2004)
  • Affordable Housing: Designing an American Asset (February 28, 2004–August 8, 2004)
  • Envisioning Architecture: Drawings from the Museum of Modern Art, New York (March 20, 2004–June 20, 2004)
  • Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio: Community Architecture (May 22, 2004–September 6, 2004)
  • Kid’s View of the City 2004: Eaton Elementary School Student Projects (May 23, 2004–August 1, 2004)
  • Liquid Stone: New Architecture in Concrete (June 19, 2004–January 29, 2006)
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 13, 2004–October 10, 2004)
  • Washington: Symbol and City (October 9, 2004–January 1, 2013)
  • 5 Friends from Japan: Children in Japan Today (November 4, 2004–February 13, 2005)
  • Origami as Architecture (November 4, 2004–April 10, 2005)

2003

  • Big & Green: Toward Sustainable Architecture in the 21st Century (January 17, 2003 – June 22, 2003)
  • Saving Mount Vernon: The Birth of Preservation in America (February 15, 2003—September 21, 2003)
  • Of Our Time: 2002 GSA Design Awards (March 27, 2003—October 19, 2003)
  • Picture This: Windows on the American Home (March 29, 2003—August 11, 2003)
  • Kids’ View of the City (May 6, 2003—July 6, 2003)
  • Building Images: Seventy Years of Photography at Hedrich Blessing (April 30, 2003—July 27, 2003)
  • Up, Down, Across: Elevators, Escalators, and Moving Sidewalks (September 12, 2003–April 18, 2004)
  • Masonry Variations (October 18, 2003–April 4, 2004)
  • Rowhouse Redux: Washington Architects Renew City Living (November 14, 2003–January 18, 2004)
  • Stories of Home: Photographs by Bill Bamberger (December 3, 2003 – March 7, 2004)

2002

  • On Track: Transit and the American City (January 26, 2002–October 29, 2002)
  • Modeled Space/Space Modeled (January 31, 2002–March 31, 2002)
  • A New World Trade Center: Design Proposals (April 6, 2002–June 10, 2002)
  • Windows on Work: Building America from the Collections of the Washington Print Club (April 17, 2002–August 11, 2002)
  • The Turner City Collection: Rendering a Century of Building (May 4, 2002–November 3, 2002)
  • Windshield: Richard Neutra’s House for the John Nicholas Brown Family (May 25, 2002–August 18, 2002)
  • Creative Works in the City (June 6, 2002–July 7, 2002)
  • Building America (online exhibition) (June 14, 2002–April 30, 2008)
  • Zaha Hadid Laboratory (August 17, 2002–November 17, 2002)
  • Me, Myself and Infrastructure: Private Lives and Public Works in America (October 4, 2002–February 16, 2003)
  • Do It Yourself: Home Improvement in 20th-Century America (October 17, 2002–August 10, 2003)
  • Pentagon Memorial Competition – Stage One Entry Display (October 30, 2002–November 9, 2002)

2001

  • The Architecture of Reassurance: Designing Disney Theme Parks (March 17, 2001–August 5, 2001)
  • Federal Design Now! The 2000 GSA Design Awards (March 29, 2001–July 8, 2001)
  • Restore, Renew, Rediscover Your Historic Neighborhood Schools: The National Preservation Week Poster Competition Winners (May 15, 2001—June 13, 2001)
  • Creative Works in the City (June 7, 2001–July 4, 2001)
  • The Architecture of R.M. Schindler (June 29, 2001–October 14, 2001)
  • From Arts and Crafts to Modern Design: The Architecture of William L. Price (August 18, 2001–March 24, 2002)
  • Cesar Pelli: Connections (September 12, 2001–April 28, 2002)
  • Monuments and Memory: Washington D.C. Architects Explore the Language of Monuments (September 29, 2001–February 3, 2002)
  • A Genius for Place: American Landscapes of the Country Place Era (October 6, 2001–February 18, 2002)
  • Twin Towers Remembered: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara (November 10, 2001–March 10, 2002)

2000

  • Scale: The Architectural League’s Young Architects Forum 1999 (January 14, 2000–April 16, 2000)
  • Frank Lloyd Wright: Windows of the Darwin D. Martin House (February 17, 2000–August 20, 2000)
  • The White House in Miniature (March 29, 2000–September 17, 2000)
  • Reinvigorating Cities: Smart Growth and Choices for Change (April 19, 2000–September 6, 2000)
  • Nature Constructed/Nature Revealed: Eco-Revelatory Design (April 27, 2000–October 22, 2000)
  • Main Street Five-and-Dimes: The Architectural Legacy of the S. H. Kress & Co. Stores
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 1, 2000–September 1, 2000)
  • WOOD: An American Tradition (September 9, 2000–April 22, 2001)
  • Tools as Art VI: Instruments of Change (September 16, 2000–February 9, 2004)
  • Metropolitan Perspectives: Smart Growth and Choices for Change (October 11, 2000–March 4, 2001)
  • Drawing for the Future: Design Drawings for the 1939 New York World’s Fair (October 13, 2000–January 14, 2001)
  • Monuments, Mills, and Missile Sites: Thirty Years of the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) (October 26, 2000–May 20, 2001)
  • On the Job: Design and the American Office (November 18, 2000–August 19, 2001)
  • Ten Shades of Green (December 2, 2000–February 14, 2001)

1999

  • Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Architect: A Retrospective (January 30, 1999–August 15, 1999)
  • Personal Edens: The Gardens and Film Sets of Florence Yoch (February 12, 1999–April 4, 1999)
  • An Urban Experiment in Central Berlin: Planning Potsdamer Platz (March 24, 1999–September 19, 1999)
  • Continuing the Legacy: The 1998 GSA Design Awards (March 25, 1999–September 5, 1999)
  • Where Do We Go From Here: Smart Growth and Choices for Change (April 20, 1999–September 7, 1999)
  • Stay Cool! Air Conditioning America (May 1, 1999–January 2, 2000)
  • Titanium! (May 20, 1999–July 18, 1999)
  • Visions for a New Century: Washington Architects Share Their Visions for the First Century of the New Millennium (June 11, 1999–October 3, 1999)
  • Tools as Art V: Fantasy at Work (June 30, 1999–January 9, 2000)
  • Investigating Where We Live (August 1, 1999–September 1, 1999)
  • The Corner Store (September 23, 1999–August 6, 2000)
  • Reimagining the Suburbs: Smart Growth and Choices for Change (October 22, 1999–March 26, 2000)
  • See the U.S.A.: Automobile Travel and the American Landscape (November 19, 1999–July 9, 2000)

1998

  • Breaking Through: The Creative Engineer (February 26, 1998–November 8, 1998)
  • Completing the Federal Triangle: The Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center (April 19, 1998–September 27, 1998)
  • Building Culture Downtown: New Ways of Revitalizing the American City (May 2, 1998–January 3, 1999)
  • The Business of Innovation: Bechtel’s First Century (June 5, 1998–January 4, 1999)
  • Tools as Art IV: Material Illusions (June 26, 1998–May 16, 1999)
  • City Satire: The Cartoons of Roger K. Lewis (October 15, 1998–February 28, 1999)
  • Forgotten Gateway: The Abandoned Buildings of Ellis Island (November 12, 1998–May 2, 1999)
  • El Nuevo Mundo: The Landscape of Latino Los Angeles (December 3, 1998–March 28, 1999)

1997

  • The Man Who Built Washington: John McShain and the American Construction Industry (February 14, 1997–April 20, 1997)
  • Views of Washington: Perspective Drawings by Mori Shizume (February 14, 1997–May 1997)
  • CityVision: Student Projects from the National Building Museum (February 28, 1997–March 20, 1997)
  • Building for the People of the United States of America: The GSA 1996 Design Awards (March 20, 1997–May 4, 1997)
  • Tools as Art II: Exploring Metaphor (April 11, 1997–September 28, 1997)
  • Capital Visions: Architects Revisit L’Enfant, New Plans for the Millennium (May 1, 1997–October 26, 1997)
  • Main Street Five-and-Dimes: The Architectural Heritage of the S. H. Kress & Co. Stores (May 9, 1997–March 15, 1998)
  • Lying Lightly on the Land: Building America’s National Park Roads and Parkways (June 6, 1997–January 11, 1998)
  • Sheltered by Design (June 20, 1997–January 1998)
  • Tools as Art III: All Saws (October 31, 1997–April 19, 1998)
  • Planning Washington’s Monumental Core: L’Enfant to Legacy (November 24, 1997–June 30, 1998)
  • Civics Lessons: Recent New York Public Architecture (December 5, 1997–May 11, 1998)

1996

  • The New American Ghetto: Photographs by Camilo José Vergara (January 26, 1996–May 5, 1996)
  • A Recent View of Architecture: Photographs by Paul Warchol (February 16, 1996–April 14, 1996)
  • Building the Ballyhoo: Architectural Photography by the Wurts Brothers Company (February 16, 1996–August 18, 1996)
  • Between Fences (May 31, 1996–January 5, 1997)
  • Three Buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright: American Spirit Alive in Japan (June 21, 1996–February 18, 1997)
  • The Pull of Beauty (June 27, 1996–August 11, 1996)
  • Architectural Watercolors by Lauretta Vinciarelli (September 13, 1996–November 10, 1996)
  • An American Embassy in Berlin (November 1996–March 1997)
  • “Go Out Into the Street”: Views of the City from the Washington Print Club (November 21, 1996–March 9, 1997)

1995

  • Building a Federal Legacy: The 1994 General Services Administration Design Awards (March 10, 1995–April 9, 1995)
  • Ticket to Paradise (May 4, 1995–October 15, 1995)
  • Fragile Dwelling: Photographs of Homeless Communities by Margaret Morton (June 15, 1995–November 8, 1995)
  • The Dome: Symbol of American Democracy (October 20, 1995–April 14, 1996)
  • “We Will Be Back”: Oklahoma City Rebuilds (November 17, 1995–May 5, 1996)
  • Chairmania (November 20, 1995–January 14, 1996)

1994

  • Barn Again! (March 12, 1994–September 11, 1994)
  • The Art of Building in North Carolina (May 10, 1994–November 13, 1994)
  • Saudi Arabian Art and Sport Architecture (June 18, 1994–July 4, 1994)
  • Visions of Home: Architects’ Explorations of Dwelling and Community (October 6, 1994–March 26, 1995)
  • World War II and the American Dream: How Wartime Building Changed a Nation (November 11, 1994–December 31, 1995)
  • Making It in the Birmingham District (December 15, 1994–June 4, 1995)

1993

  • Women of Design (January 1993–May 1993)
  • The Art of Architecture: The Pritzker Architecture Prize (March 1993–April 1993)
  • Architects in the Making: Perspectives From Four Schools (May 1993–June 1993)
  • La Casa de Todos Nosotros (A House For Us All) (July 1993–January 1994)

1992

  • Architects in the Making: Perspectives From Four Schools (April 1992–May 1992)
  • Making it Work: Pittsburgh Defines a City (April 1992–September 1992)
  • Interface Berlin: Images of a City (May 1992–July 1992)
  • Choosing Futures: Planning America’s Communities (May 1992–August 1992)
  • Visions/Revisions: The Second DC/AIA Biennial Exhibition (October 1992–January 1993)
  • From Mars to Main Street: America Designs, 1965-1990 (November 1992–February 1994)

1991

  • Architects in the Making: Visions and Reality (January 1991–February 1991)
  • Ideal Places: Rockefeller Visions for America (March 1991–September 1991)
  • Mondo Materialis (April 1991–September 1991)
  • Washington: Symbol and City (v.1) (June 1991–September 3, 2001)
  • Building a Landmark: The National Building Museum’s Historic Home (Fall 1991–September 3, 2001)
  • Urban Land Institute Awards for Excellence (November 1991–March 1992)
  • Held in Common: Historic Architecture in America’s National Parks (December 1991–February 1992)

1990

  • Engineering Excellence Awards Competition (March 1990–April 1990)
  • Competitions x 3 (traveling version of the memorial design exhibition) (March 1990–February 1991)
  • Building by Design: Architecture at IBM (March 1990–October 1990)
  • The Making of a Monument: The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, Part II (May 1990–September 1990)
  • Four Washington Banks (May 1990–September 1990)
  • Money Matters: A Critical Look at Bank Architecture (May 1990–September 1990)
  • To Build a Bridge (Reinstallation of “Anatomy of a Bridge”) (September 1990–December 1993)
  • Give Us Your Best: An Exhibition of Washington Architects’ Work (October 1990–December 1990)
  • The Blue Ridge Parkway (October 1990–August 1991)
  • Windows Through Time: American Windows From the 1630s to the 1930s (November 1990–July 1991)
  • Heritage to Build/Heritage to Keep: 1990 General Services Administration Design Awards (November 1990–August 1991)
  • Yale University School of Architecture Design Studios (December 1990–January 1991)

1989

  • Samuel Yellin (March 1989–July 1989)
  • In Pursuit of Excellence:  The Federal Judiciary Office Building Competition (March 1989–August 1989)
  • The Experimental Tradition: Twenty-Five Years of American Architectural Competitions, 1960-1985 (April 1989–July 1989)
  • Displays of Three Design Competitions for Memorials to be Built in Washington, D.C.: Korean War Veterans Memorial, National Peace Garden, and Women in Military Service for America Memorial (May 1989–January 1990)
  • Tools as Art: The Hechinger Collection (September 1989–March 1990)
  • The Making of a Monument: The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, Part I (October 1989–February 1990)
  • Architecture in Academia: An Exhibition of Student Work (November 1989–March 1990)
  • For the Record: How the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record Documents America’s Heritage (December 1989–February 1990)

1988

  • Sheet Metal Craftsmanship: Progress in Building (January 1988–October 1988)
  • James Wilson Rouse: Urban Visionary (March 1988–November 1988)
  • The Old Pension Building (June 1988–February 1990)
  • Thomas Tefft: American Architecture in Transition, 1845-1860 (August 1988–October 1988)
  • Best Addresses: A Century of Washington’s Distinguished Apartment Houses (September 1988–April 1989)
  • Viollet-le-Duc: Architect, Artist, Master of Historic Preservation (October 1988–December 1988)
  • Documenting Our Heritage: The Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record, 1988 Projects (December 1988–February 1989)

1987

  • Hugh Ferriss: Metropolis (February 1987–May 1987)
  • Twenty Years of Restoration in Venice, 1966-1986 (October 1987–January 1988)
  • Liberty: The French-American Statue in Art and History (November 1987–February 1988)

1986

  • Built for the People of the United States of America: Fifty Years of TVA Architecture (March 1986–September 1986)
  • Ornamental Architecture Reborn: A New Terra Cotta Vocabulary (June 1986–November 1986)
  • Good Design in the Community: Columbus, Indiana (October 1986–January 1987)
  • American Decorative Window Glass, 1860-1890: The Home as a Heaven Below (December 1986–July 1987)

1985

  • Anatomy of a Bridge: Seven Steps in Constructing the Brooklyn Bridge (October 1985–May 1986).
  • Building a National Image: Architectural Drawings for the American Democracy, 1789-1912 (October 1985–February 1986)
  • America’s Master Metalworker: Samuel B. Yellin, 1885-1940 (October 1985–July 1987)
  • An Architectural Wonder: The U.S. Pension Building (October 1985–July 1987)