Zachary Levine

Director of Exhibitions & Collections
zlevine@nbm.org
202.272.2448, ext. 3405

Overview

Zachary Paul Levine oversees exhibition development and project management, and collections strategy for the National Building Museum. For nearly two decades, Levine has guided audiences in the exploration art and history in museums and other cultural agencies, advocacy and professional organizations, and academia.

Since 2010, Levine has worked as a curator and consultant for museums and artists throughout the U.S. and abroad, managing projects and teams of varying complexity and duration including exhibitions, installations, educational programs, publications, and media. He cut his teeth in museums as curator at Yeshiva University Museum in New York where he developed exhibitions on the intersection of art and history through diverse topics such as amateur travel films, comic books, textile art, and religion and architecture in urban history. In addition to curation, he produced gallery films and digital interactives, cultivated the museum’s online identity, and oversaw exhibition project management.

Levine came to Washington, D.C., in 2014 to develop the core exhibition for the unbuilt Capital Jewish Museum. He designed and tested content for a 5,000 square foot core exhibition, conceived and directed publications and public events, wrote and administered grants, aligned collecting strategy with the new museum’s vision, and published PR materials and bi-weekly articles. Of note, in this position Levine directed fundraising, PR and logistics to rescue of Washington’s only known synagogue mural. He has also worked as an independent consultant, providing strategic guidance, project planning and management, and grant-writing services for museums, artists, historical societies, and arts and social-justice organizations.

Levine trained as a historian of east and central Europe. He specialized in Cold War history and international philanthropy. Levine’s historical interests broadly include the history and culture of technological innovation, nationalism, and the built environment. He regularly speaks publicly on historical issues, as well as matters of importance to the museum community. He serves on the board of the Council of American Jewish Museums (since 2013) as Vice Chair, and, notably, has planned several national conferences, workshops and other initiatives for that organization.

Selected Publications

“The Latest Revolutionary Chapter?” in Graphic Details: Jewish Women’s Confessional Comics in Essays and Interviews, McFarland (2014)

“A Curatorial Tour: It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond,” in It’s a Thin Line: Eruv from Talmudic to Modern Culture, KTAV (2014)

“Concealed in the Open: Recipients of International Clandestine Jewish Aid in Early 1950s Hungary,” in Journal of the American Hungarian Educators Association (2012)