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Richard Moe

Vincent Scully Prize

December 13, 2007  


Richard
Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation
© National Trust for Historic Preservation

On December 13, 2007, the National Building Museum presented the ninth Vincent Scully Prize to Richard Moe. The award recognizes Moe’s leadership in moving historic preservation into the mainstream of American life and expanding the public’s understanding of the importance of protecting and celebrating our heritage. The ceremony included opening remarks by Carolyn Brody, immediate past chair, National Building Museum and chair of the Capital Campaign, National Trust for Historic Preservation; Paul Goldberger, architecture critic, The New Yorker; and William Hart, former chairman, National Trust for Historic Preservation. Following the ceremony, Moe gave a presentation on how preservation is making a difference in the economic vitality and livability of communities by supporting smart growth and sustainability.

About Richard Moe

Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation leads the National Trust in its mission to save the nation’s diverse historic places and create more livable communities for all Americans. Under his direction, the organization has greatly strengthened its financial base, reaffirmed its commitment to expanding and diversifying the organized preservation movement, become an outspoken and effective advocate of controlling sprawl and encouraging smart growth, and launched innovative initiatives to demonstrate preservation’s effectiveness as a tool for community revitalization.

A native of Duluth, Minnesota, Moe graduated from Williams College in 1959 and received a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1966. An honorary member of The American Institute of Architects, Moe has been awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Maryland and the University of Minnesota.

He is co-author of Changing Places: Rebuilding Community in the Age of Sprawl, a study of the causes of urban decline and the use of historic preservation as a tool for revitalization, published in 1997; and author of The Last Full Measure: The Life and Death of the First Minnesota Volunteers, a Civil War history published in 1993.

The National Building Museum is grateful for the generous donations to the Vincent Scully Prize received since its inception, which sustain the program.